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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my trusty old Saab got turned away by the bodyshop. "Can't respray it, the rot's in the metal, needs metalwork". That adds up to a number bigger than the car's value, so I'm suddenly looking at EVs a year or two sooner than I expected. Requirements: range, storage, handling, roughly in that order of preference.

Range: 300+ miles, or as close as possible. Cuts out most things
Storage: I'm a bass player and mountain biker. Saloon cars need not apply, hatchbacks or estates only.
Handling: My last 3 cars have been lowered, re-shocked and powerflex'd in search of twisty road fun. That, the range factor and the fact that I generally detest them, means virtually all SUVs are out.

Left with: Polestar 2, Taycan Tourismo, Tesla Model S and (late entry) the i4. I'll be honest, I didn't even realise it was a hatchback at first.

I couldn't get anywhere to even let me have a look at a Polestar. Game over pretty much there and then
Model S second hand prices are nuts to get one with decent range. New prices even worse. First one I went to see had a flat 12v battery and one of the door handles wouldn't come out to play. Instant black mark. Interior okay but uninspiring, hate the 'everything on one massive central screen' concept.
Drove an M50 i4 last weekend. Massively impressed with almost all aspects of it
Taycan test drive this weekend, but given the price of even the poverty-spec Tourismo, I think I know the answer already.

So basically, I've specced up an e40 with all the toys and am ready to push the button pending this weekend's Porsche test. My only problem is that having read a few posts here, I'm now wondering if I should be getting the M50 and gamble on the range difference not being as much as suggested and not making the biannual 350 trek to see family far longer than it needs to be. Then there's the handling argument, too...
 

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Welcome to the forum! Please share your impressions of the Taycan test vs. the i4 once you have tested it.

I was like you. Had chosen to go with the e40, but the price for upgrading to M50 is really small compared to the extra performance you will receive. If you want to maximize the range, then go with 18" or 19" wheels, and don't choose the 20" which will eat lots of range on the M50.
 

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Welcome!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum! Please share your impressions of the Taycan test vs. the i4 once you have tested it.

I was like you. Had chosen to go with the e40, but the price for upgrading to M50 is really small compared to the extra performance you will receive. If you want to maximize the range, then go with 18" or 19" wheels, and don't choose the 20" which will eat lots of range on the M50.
Thanks. Taycan was interesting - a step above the M50, for sure, but not worth the extra £30k, to my mind. I got a 4s to drive, though my interest was primarily in the Tourismo, which they don't have as a demonstrator. You're very aware of its size, but like the i4, you don't feel the weight and bulk when you're on twisty roads. Having a Porsche chaperone, I didn't get to go nuts with it, but would be interesting to see what it feels like towards the edge of its grip, because from what I was doing, it felt like it'd never run out of either grip or traction.

Other things I noted:
  • It also retains the unnecessary transmission tunnel, front and rear.
  • Whereas the i4 gets rid of most physical buttons, Taycan gets rid of all of them. Not sure about that one, though the dash display itself is nicer and more intuitive, IMO.
  • Boot space feels significantly compromised, given its claimed space
  • The options list is terrifying. Speccing a car with anything like the toys the M50 has as standard will have you heading to £100k in no time at all
  • Two (different) charging connectors on opposite sides of the car. Why?

For the moment, on a purely practical level, the i4 is winning. Maybe in four years' time when battery technology has moved on, they'll have an option with better range and more internal space due to thinner batteries. At that point I might consider it, but while I'm looking at occasional journeys of 300-odd motorway miles, it's just not quite enough.

I'm still worried about my choice of the edrive40 - I wish I could get one to drive to compare against the M50. On paper, the range (particularly minimum quoted range) makes it a no-brainer, but I'm used to driving 280bhp turbo cars and motorbikes, I really don't want to lose all that low-down acceleration that the M50 had...
 

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Thanks. Taycan was interesting - a step above the M50, for sure, but not worth the extra £30k, to my mind. I got a 4s to drive, though my interest was primarily in the Tourismo, which they don't have as a demonstrator. You're very aware of its size, but like the i4, you don't feel the weight and bulk when you're on twisty roads. Having a Porsche chaperone, I didn't get to go nuts with it, but would be interesting to see what it feels like towards the edge of its grip, because from what I was doing, it felt like it'd never run out of either grip or traction.

Other things I noted:
  • It also retains the unnecessary transmission tunnel, front and rear.
  • Whereas the i4 gets rid of most physical buttons, Taycan gets rid of all of them. Not sure about that one, though the dash display itself is nicer and more intuitive, IMO.
  • Boot space feels significantly compromised, given its claimed space
  • The options list is terrifying. Speccing a car with anything like the toys the M50 has as standard will have you heading to £100k in no time at all
  • Two (different) charging connectors on opposite sides of the car. Why?

For the moment, on a purely practical level, the i4 is winning. Maybe in four years' time when battery technology has moved on, they'll have an option with better range and more internal space due to thinner batteries. At that point I might consider it, but while I'm looking at occasional journeys of 300-odd motorway miles, it's just not quite enough.

I'm still worried about my choice of the edrive40 - I wish I could get one to drive to compare against the M50. On paper, the range (particularly minimum quoted range) makes it a no-brainer, but I'm used to driving 280bhp turbo cars and motorbikes, I really don't want to lose all that low-down acceleration that the M50 had...
Since you haven't had an EV before, I'll just mention something.

Most likely, you will NOT get the advertised range. BMW may be closer than others (Tesla), but the WLTP and EPA ranges are so contrived that it doesn't really meet with real driving.

For example, my Tesla model 3 LR AWD is rated for 300 miles ('18), and to get that, it needs to be 60F, flat road, 55 MPH. That doesn't happen often around me. And if it gets cold where you are, expect a fairly dramatic decrease (25-40%). This is just part of the EV game.
 

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Not to rain on your parade but waiting time for an i4 order seems to be 8-12 months right now, so if your Saab is on its last leg, you might need to figure out how to bridge the gap. Most of us have solid transportation so we're ok shooting the breeze and joke about the waiting time...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not to rain on your parade but waiting time for an i4 order seems to be 8-12 months right now, so if your Saab is on its last leg, you might need to figure out how to bridge the gap. Most of us have solid transportation so we're ok shooting the breeze and joke about the waiting time...
Yep, all EVs that fit my requirements are looking about that right now. "Last legs" is a relative term, I guess - the mechanicals are more than fine (running Stage 3 tune with sorted suspension), just the age is starting to show in the bodywork and interior. It's only showing as bubbles along the wheel arches and door bottoms at the moment, but sadly that already means more expense in metalwork and paint than the car is actually worth. So there's realistically a couple of Scottish winters left in it before it starts to get really bad, but tbh, I don't want to be driving a rust bucket around, so I'm looking at its replacement now :)

Also, I have the wife's Mini Cooper S to play with, but fitting a bass guitar and amplifier in that is a bit of a comedy show...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Since you haven't had an EV before, I'll just mention something.

Most likely, you will NOT get the advertised range. BMW may be closer than others (Tesla), but the WLTP and EPA ranges are so contrived that it doesn't really meet with real driving.

For example, my Tesla model 3 LR AWD is rated for 300 miles ('18), and to get that, it needs to be 60F, flat road, 55 MPH. That doesn't happen often around me. And if it gets cold where you are, expect a fairly dramatic decrease (25-40%). This is just part of the EV game.
Thanks for the heads-up - I'd got that impression when trying to find out what actual ranges people were getting out of these things, especially on the motorway/highway. The bulk of my usage will be 20m commutes, but we have family living 350+ miles away, so I just needed to go for the longest declared range I could find, on the basis that none of them would do it in a single run yet. Maybe in four years' time when the finance is due for renewal, battery technology will have moved on a notch...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@stealthdj

This is the official Canadian range numbers in kilometres depending on wheel size to get an idea. Very similar to what EPA numbers will be.
View attachment 5341
Cheers - useful info. I'm looking at going for the '40 with 19" wheels, probably look at adding a set of 18s with winter tyres on, which will hopefully balance some of the cold weather losses...
 

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Cheers - useful info. I'm looking at going for the '40 with 19" wheels, probably look at adding a set of 18s with winter tyres on, which will hopefully balance some of the cold weather losses...
Good choice I believe you will only need one stop for charging when you will go visiting your family :)
 

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Thanks for the heads-up - I'd got that impression when trying to find out what actual ranges people were getting out of these things, especially on the motorway/highway. The bulk of my usage will be 20m commutes, but we have family living 350+ miles away, so I just needed to go for the longest declared range I could find, on the basis that none of them would do it in a single run yet. Maybe in four years' time when the finance is due for renewal, battery technology will have moved on a notch...
As another heads up, all of these EV's charge much faster at lower SoC's (State of Charge). So you may be better off stopping multiple times for shorter charges, then a single long charge. As an example, you can probably charge from 10-75% in 20 minutes, and another 20-30 minutes to go from 75-100. (Those are contrived, but there are real numbers for i4 and other EV's.)

Tools like ABRP (A Better Route Planner) takes the charge rates into accounts, and can help plan the shortest trip.
 

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As another heads up, all of these EV's charge much faster at lower SoC's (State of Charge). So you may be better off stopping multiple times for shorter charges, then a single long charge. As an example, you can probably charge from 10-75% in 20 minutes, and another 20-30 minutes to go from 75-100. (Those are contrived, but there are real numbers for i4 and other EV's.)

Tools like ABRP (A Better Route Planner) takes the charge rates into accounts, and can help plan the shortest trip.
Yes it is the best way to charge on a road trip, it is confirmed by Bjorn Ryan on his 1000 km tests.
 

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As another heads up, all of these EV's charge much faster at lower SoC's (State of Charge).
I think this is true of fast charge of any battery device. The same is true of mobile phones. At a higher SOC you have to reduce the charge rate or you damage the battery.
 

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I think this is true of fast charge of any battery device. The same is true of mobile phones. At a higher SOC you have to reduce the charge rate or you damage the battery.
The best strategy IMO is to keep the max SOC at 80%, except the night before long trip, if you can charge at home or at a hotel, let it go to 100% in your sleep, then go and re-charge to 80% or just enough to get where you want to go if you have recharging capability at your destination. More and more hotels have AC chargers, it's often free (though may be not forever), even in charging deprived US, and if you have the ability, you should definitely have a charger at home.
BMW does recommend against charging to 100% at a DC highspeed charger, but I saw a test of the similar IX that seemed to maintain a fairly decent 30kW all the way to 93%, I don't remember which channel.
 

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From what I have read, if you need to charge to 100%, it is best to do it just before you need to use the car. Don't charge to 100% and then leave the car standing for a few days.

That said, I think some of us with higher OCD tendencies will probably need to chill a bit. I'm sure the occasional bit of poor battery management isn't going to make any significant difference in the long run.
 
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