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'LAST FUEL CAR NORWAY IN 2022'

Norway officially plans to ban the new sales of non-electric new passenger cars from 2025. However, if the current trend continues, the purely fuel-powered car will disappear from the Norwegian scene as early as 2022.

Measures such as a total ban on the sale of cars with a combustion engine are of course intended to accelerate the transition to electric. In Norway, however, this measure seems unnecessary, because the transformation is going a lot faster than expected.

According to a report from Motor.no, a publication of the Norwegian Automobile Federation (NAF), the EV will displace the traditionally powered car from Norwegian sales rankings as early as April 2022. You read that right: in no more than seven months, every car sold in Norway may have some form of electric drive. Motor.no bases this on recent sales figures. For example, it notes that petrol and diesel cars still accounted for more than 25 percent of sales in 2017, while the share of petrol and diesel has already fallen in the first 8 months of this year to 4.93 and 4.73 respectively. per cent.

However, Motor.no also acknowledges that the approaching end of petrol and diesel cars does not mean that the EV will have the exclusive right from next year. For example, the medium states that for the time being there is still a small market for these types of cars, including in the form of small, affordable four-wheel drive units from Suzuki.

Perhaps more importantly, the figures do not seem to take into account the share of hybrids, or partially electrically powered cars. If we look at the share of the pure EV, it is striking that in 2019 they controlled almost half of the Norwegian market. In 2020 that was already more than half and in the most recent report on Norwegian car sales, that share was 70 percent. The growth of EV sales is therefore going fast, but reaching 100 percent in a good six months also seems ambitious. On the other hand, the purely fuel-driven car is quickly disappearing: in August only 7.8 percent fell into this category.

Since the very first revival of the EV, Norway has been working on incentives that even the Netherlands cannot match. Anyone who does not purchase an EV in this country deprives themselves of so many advantages that the fuel car is only a sensible solution in very specific cases.

Source: autoweek.nl
 

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'LAST FUEL CAR NORWAY IN 2022'

Norway officially plans to ban the new sales of non-electric new passenger cars from 2025. However, if the current trend continues, the purely fuel-powered car will disappear from the Norwegian scene as early as 2022.

Measures such as a total ban on the sale of cars with a combustion engine are of course intended to accelerate the transition to electric. In Norway, however, this measure seems unnecessary, because the transformation is going a lot faster than expected.

According to a report from Motor.no, a publication of the Norwegian Automobile Federation (NAF), the EV will displace the traditionally powered car from Norwegian sales rankings as early as April 2022. You read that right: in no more than seven months, every car sold in Norway may have some form of electric drive. Motor.no bases this on recent sales figures. For example, it notes that petrol and diesel cars still accounted for more than 25 percent of sales in 2017, while the share of petrol and diesel has already fallen in the first 8 months of this year to 4.93 and 4.73 respectively. per cent.

However, Motor.no also acknowledges that the approaching end of petrol and diesel cars does not mean that the EV will have the exclusive right from next year. For example, the medium states that for the time being there is still a small market for these types of cars, including in the form of small, affordable four-wheel drive units from Suzuki.

Perhaps more importantly, the figures do not seem to take into account the share of hybrids, or partially electrically powered cars. If we look at the share of the pure EV, it is striking that in 2019 they controlled almost half of the Norwegian market. In 2020 that was already more than half and in the most recent report on Norwegian car sales, that share was 70 percent. The growth of EV sales is therefore going fast, but reaching 100 percent in a good six months also seems ambitious. On the other hand, the purely fuel-driven car is quickly disappearing: in August only 7.8 percent fell into this category.

Since the very first revival of the EV, Norway has been working on incentives that even the Netherlands cannot match. Anyone who does not purchase an EV in this country deprives themselves of so many advantages that the fuel car is only a sensible solution in very specific cases.

Source: autoweek.nl
Norway has the best incentives for EV’s, it’s a great example.

Specially if you take into consideration it’s an oil producer!

And I believe good charging infrastructure as well (from Bjorn videos :) ).

I’ve seen also a video from Kris Rifa at the airport park where he shows lots of rows for EV charging (EV paradise as he called it).
 

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It’s complicated. Well not really, but Norway taxes nice cars so much it’s the worst country for a car enthusiast to live in. The last decade it got slightly better, but now it’s an anti car political wave washing over the country.
The EV incentives were supposed to last until there were 25% EVs, and are very expensive for the government to have.
Since it’s hard to oppose climate friendly policies, regardless of how effective it is per money spent on it, the advantages have been kept even as cars transcended from the horrible Buddy plastic cars and Leafs to actual desirable cars. Now the election is over and probably taxes will start coming next year. No politician wanted to fall on the sword cutting away the one thing people actually like.. but since it’s 4 years till reelection they will probably do it next year. Everything else is taxed so much in this country, so it’s been a strange oddity that this has been so beneficial for so long. I would have bought an m440i if it was different.
 

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To make it easier to understand why this is happening in Norway, i have copy pasted this from my previous post on a different forum. Comparing prices on ICE cars, Teslas and BMW EVs.

Keep in mind it was even worse, and have gotten abit better. But norwegians have been used to paying doubble price for normal family cars and even three or four times the actual car prize for anything with performance.

All of a sudden you can get cars for what they cost to buy from the factory, and even without paying VAT on anything related to the purchase. The taxes we have on ICE cars is so mad nobody would get away with introducing them in one go. Its simply legislation from the 50s that where made for taxing 650kg fiat500s with 25HP on weight and power that have progressivley became more and more insane. Dont get me wrong they where high taxes then, but it has gotten way worse due to the calculations being what they are.. 😄

The numbers are from august 2021, and the cars are stock spec no extras or packages just the price converted from norwegian configurators.


Short range TM3 40371$
Long range TM3 51894$
Performance TM3 57672$

BMW 320IX Sedan 60095$
BMW M340i xDrive Sedan MHEV 95911$
BMW M3 Sedan 129760$

BMW i4 eDrive40 57962$
BMW i4 m50 63671$

Some SUV prices for fun as we also have weight taxes.

Long range TM Y 61699$
Performance TM Y 68054$

BMW iX3 68285$

BMW X3 xDrive30e 76013$ (hybrid incentives cheapest model available)
BMW X3 M40i 121826$
BMW X3M is not available, X5M however is a wooping 278333$ .. Fully specced 318256$ . 😂
 
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