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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Bimmers,

This forum is an incredible mine of information, I started to copy/paste the best information in a Google Doc.

I'm mostly interested in the technical data, but there is a lot to say: from iDrive8 to the aesthetics of the rims and adaptive suspensions.
 

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Re: WLTP

Sorry I dont get this!

City Highway
415km / 300km (-10°C)
520km /340km (+10°C)
470km / 335km (+30°C)

That means abouve 10°C the M50 only drives 340km from 100% to 0% at which speed (100km/h?). So since you probbaly never drive down the battery less then 15% it would make only about 300km?

Then you actually never charge 100% because the last 20% take much longer? Which means next distance untill charging is only about 70% of capacity which equals about 240km ?

My next concern is that in Germany you actually drive at 160 - 170 km/h at least on some roads, even in France or Italy I tend to drive close to 150.
So thats another -20 till -30% ?

So after that calculation that means not that much more then 200km distance at arround 160km/h on a highway?
Which means about 4 x 35 minute stops, if you are lucky and get a fast charging station if you want to drive 1000km ?

So thats 2h idealy.

If you are not lucky? What does that mean 3-4h ?

This seams not that practically to me.

Of cause with a combustion car I stop about 4 Times too, but then I jog arround the Gas Sation 5 Minutes and eat and drink and get patrol once, that not that much abouve 1h.
 

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Re: WLTP

Sorry I dont get this!

City Highway
415km / 300km (-10°C)
520km /340km (+10°C)
470km / 335km (+30°C)

That means abouve 10°C the M50 only drives 340km from 100% to 0% at which speed (100km/h?). So since you probbaly never drive down the battery less then 15% it would make only about 300km?

Then you actually never charge 100% because the last 20% take much longer? Which means next distance untill charging is only about 70% of capacity which equals about 240km ?

My next concern is that in Germany you actually drive at 160 - 170 km/h at least on some roads, even in France or Italy I tend to drive close to 150.
So thats another -20 till -30% ?

So after that calculation that means not that much more then 200km distance at arround 160km/h on a highway?
Which means about 4 x 35 minute stops, if you are lucky and get a fast charging station if you want to drive 1000km ?

So thats 2h idealy.

If you are not lucky? What does that mean 3-4h ?

This seams not that practically to me.

Of cause with a combustion car I stop about 4 Times too, but then I jog arround the Gas Sation 5 Minutes and eat and drink and get patrol once, that not that much abouve 1h.
Well, that's part of driving an EV.
To get a better range, you need to apply an other driving style compared to driving and ICE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
abouve 10°C the M50 only drives 340km from 100% to 0% at which speed (100km/h?)
@WLTP, highway = 131 km/h max

So since you probbaly never drive down the battery less then 15% it would make only about 300km?

Then you actually never charge 100% because the last 20% take much longer?
Which means next distance untill charging is only about 70% of capacity which equals about 240km ?


My next concern is that in Germany you actually drive at 160 - 170 km/h at least on some roads, even in France or Italy I tend to drive close to 150.
So thats another -20 till -30% ?

It also depends on drive mode :
165km/h ~ [email protected] / [email protected]
150km/h ~ [email protected] / [email protected]

If you are lucky and get a fast charging station if you want to drive 1000km ?
Be aware that in France, you will not be lucky

This seams not that practically to me.
It's EV-way of life


travel with 3 persons plus baggage, so thats another factor of how many minus %? 10?
yes : let's say 3x75kg + 50kg = 275kg
Car weight + passenger ~ 2365kg
=> +11% weight => -11% range (if ratio is linear)
 

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2022 BMW i4 e40 Brooklyn Grey
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So since you probbaly never drive down the battery less then 15%
i dont see an issue with discharging to 5% - it is not an ICE where you start looking for gas station when you hit 100km mark - here it is much more accurate and gives you battery status like your phoe up to 1% not 1/4 of a gas tank
as for any question of simulation - use ABRP (abetterrouteplaner) website to do the simuylations - you can set additional weight there, temperature, max speed, even rain or snow and see how often and how long you should be charging
 
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I think stacking everything on top of each other isn't realistic or fair. If you know you are travelling far, of course you'll charge to 100%, and if you are concerned about range, just charge to 90% or even 100% on the fast charger. If you're not, charge to 80% and know you're being as nice as you can to your battery. Going down to 5% is fine, I'm so used to driving E-Golfs and whatever, and their 50% is our 15%. They also have some safety margin, I drove 5km on "0km" with a Tesla :D
Most people drive routes that they know reasonably well, so after driving somewhere once, you know how far it is, when it's nice to stop, etc, and it'll be super easy the next time. It just takes a little bit getting used to.
 

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With the included flexible fast charger what are the single-phase output options? In other words... Can I only choose between 2,3kW, 3,7kW and 7,4kW or can I choose any other kW output in between?

Thanks in advance
 

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Looking at how teslabjorn is doing the 1000km tests. Atleast the ones that i watched, it seems like doing many short stops is the way to go. This makes 100% sense because the car also charges faster at low battery%.

As the charger network gets better in continental europe it will be safer and safer to do this without worrying about if and when you reach a charger at all..

If you wanna do a big 1000km trip in one day you will ofcourse start at 100%, then you will make sure to stop for dinner somewhere your car can be topped to 80-100% meanwhile, and fill in the rest with 3-4 10 to 15min stops.

Scroll down on this article to see a sheet with charged km pr 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 - 25 - full for alot of different cars. Most of it should be readable by non norwegians.
 

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With the included flexible fast charger what are the single-phase output options? In other words... Can I only choose between 2,3kW, 3,7kW and 7,4kW or can I choose any other kW output in between?

Thanks in advance
i dont know which amperages are included in the default one but usually you can choose many different ones from 2A up to 32A (for single phase) and 16A for 3F by few different settings 2,3,5,8,10,12,16,20,25,32 in some
multiplying it by 230V (or by 690 for 3F) tells you how many Watts you get
 
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With the included flexible fast charger what are the single-phase output options? In other words... Can I only choose between 2,3kW, 3,7kW and 7,4kW or can I choose any other kW output in between?

Thanks in advance
These numbers are tied to common fuses. In other words, 10, 16 and 32A 1-phase.
32A 230V 3-phase is probably not something that exists in a lot of countries. That would give you 11kW.
32A 400V TN-C gives you 22kW. If you have a modern 3-phase intake meter, you might be able to use this.

If you want to reduce load, I wouldn't be surprised if that could be regulated from the car, don't know if it can be done continuously or by certain steps. If you are concerned about load balance, you should use a dynamic load balancing system that talks with your charger. Easee is a good pick.
 

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Old buildings here (70%) have IT systems here ,neutral is isolated and is not brought forward, 230v between the phases. The rest of Europe afaik use systems where the neutral is connected to ground, so you have 3 phases and neutral, with 400v between the phases. It’s really quite quirky, but has some safety benefits.
afaik only some Tesla can charge 11kW from this type of system, i4 cannot.
 

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I think as EV adoption increases, there will start to be problems with home supply limits being reached. Most people do not have a clue about loading limits on house power circuits. Take my house for example. I have a 100 amp main fuse. If I have the underfloor heating running on it's heating up phase, the cooker going, a kettle on AND I start the car charging, that 100 amp fuse is going to be under serious strain and will probably blow.
 

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I think as EV adoption increases, there will start to be problems with home supply limits being reached. Most people do not have a clue about loading limits on house power circuits. Take my house for example. I have a 100 amp main fuse. If I have the underfloor heating running on it's heating up phase, the cooker going, a kettle on AND I start the car charging, that 100 amp fuse is going to be under serious strain and will probably blow.
That is true but any decent smart EV charger is monitoring the current through the main line coming into your house and will also be aware of the total capacity of the main fuse and will reduce charge rate to stay under the threshold.
 

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How can it do that? If you have an analogue meter you’d need some inductive amp meters installed. Here we have digital meters with a ‘console’ out which you can connect equipment to (HAN port).
Some chargers have load balancing between chargers of the same brand to support several on one circuit, but it can’t know the current passing through other parts of your system.
 
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