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Ouch!

I had a small dent / crease pulled out about a week ago using painless dent repair, so not a chipped situation but it still hurt. Had to remove the rear passenger wheel for my tech to access the quarter panel and he did the magic. Two phone numbers I have always handy: my PDR guy and AAA.
 

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Quite unsure how easy this will be to fix by the smartrepair shops..
PDR likely. The tech has to be very experienced to handle body lines, especially when it involves the door because of bracing / structure that can be in the way. After the crease is resolved, the clearcoat touch-up may not be needed but it depends on the extent of the damage.
 

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Will PPF protect from a nice slam from another car door? I think you still might get a dent.
That's why I park away from others.
Nothing will. Even parking far away is no guarantee but it's a really good first line of defense. The PPF is a second, first line if you consider the paint chip protection as the primary purpose. The remaining measures are unfortunately for repair, like PDR or spot touch-ups.

My PDR guy told me for my previous dent/crease that there was no way another car's door did it - he believed it was a branch that rolled up and caught the side ever so slightly. Go figure.
 

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yes unfortunately........I was experimenting with "B" mode driving. Pulling into a parking space and it wasn't slowing enough, I panicked and went to apply the brakes, but hit the accellerator pedal instead and hit an exterior bld wall. Luckily it was mostly dry wall, but the repair estimate is $6500, because I scratched the $2800 right headlight. Entire front facia has to be replaced (BMW says only two available in the world), now waiting for it to arrive, so the car ca be repaired. We'll at least it was my own doing and not some random vandalism or something.
OMG, so sad to see. If it's just the bumper bits, it's not terribly bad!

On the topic of B mode, I always flip it back to D when going into parking routines - it was a quick adjustment because I could not judge B mode and therefore wanted to revert back to full brake control. Hopefully this is helpful to others who might be "experimenting" that it's better to go back into D mode for this.

Again, sorry lad!
 

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Sorry to hear it Dudenjen. Take it to a recommended BMW Auto Body Shop.

I tried B mode for all of 2 seconds and it scared me so bad I’ll never use it. I’m used to downshifting and coasting with a manual transmission which alerts people that you are slowing down gradually and reduces the risk of being rear ended.

When I was in B mode and took my foot of the accelerator it was like I slammed on the brakes hard. In my opinion that kind of driving invites disaster especially when people are high from smoking pot or looking at their phone instead of driving.
B mode takes a lot of getting used to, especially for people used to driving MT -- there's much to learn in this regard and I suspect that's why BMW made the D drive the primary and the B as secondary. At first, I thought -- why not B mode as primary? Well, now I understand that it's not set it and forget it, I have to conscientiously switch modes while driving in order to make sure I don't rear end somebody or some wall. It takes some time though.
 

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I was thinking about PPF as well.
What worried me about doing partial is my concern that the non PPF part will look different. Or am I wrong?
It's extremely hard to tell the difference between PPF and non PPF areas, especially if it was done correctly and with high quality film. I'll try and take a high quality photo of my hood where it's partial to show this...you can hardly find the PPF line on it.
 

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Here's my partial hood. The sheen is virtually indistinguishable from the original clear coat, you can compare the passenger front fender (no PPF) with the partial hood (w/ PPF). However the line is visible because there's dirt built up there in the transition. When the car is clean, it's even less visible. Most of the time I have trouble finding it at a couple feet away from the car.

Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design
 

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I saw it right away. That would bother me. Different strokes for different folks. May I politely ask why you just didn’t do the full hood?
It's a close up photo, I purposely made sure to capture the line. In a different photo, you simply cannot see it:

Car Vehicle Plant Grille Hood


The reason: I've always done it that way - the first 18" on the hood gets 99% of the damage I'm trying to defend against thus the partial coverage. The other thing I considered is removal of the full hood would be a pain compared to the partial. I've taken off PPF before, it's not fun. Depending on the formulation of the PPF, discoloration may occur and you will eventually have to redo at around 5-6yrs. It's more apparent on white paint, though.
 

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The Xpel dealer down here shows a video of him doing a full PPF on a brand new Porsche GT3. He removed the lights and everything that he could to hide the edges. That would make me nervous.
If they're reputable and have a lot of good references, there's a high chance he knows what he's doing. The local PPF shop here also has high end cars in various states of disassembly for full wraps. They don't think twice about removing trim and not only that, they also try to cover the painted pillars, inside door jambs, anything that has OE paint so it's quite extensive and a costly exercise.
 

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My concern as I stated earlier was whether or not I could see the difference between the PPF covered and non covered parts. Would the non covered part age differently, etc?
No on the first part of your question, yes on the second - age will show yellowing, no matter how good the product is or how much chemistry trickery has been put into the urethane material. Almost nothing can protect against yellowing 100%. You can probably count on 7-8 yrs on the latest films, but in my experience they eventually show age and you will either live with it or redo it.
 
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